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The first careful study—since the sketch by Leonardo da Vinci—of the interaction of male and female human genitals during coitus was published by Dickinson in 1933 (fig 2).3 A glass test tube as big as a penis in erection inserted into the vagina of female subjects who were sexually aroused by clitoral stimulation (occasionally with a vibrator) guided him in constructing his pictorial supposition.In the 1960s Masters and Johnson made their assessments with an artificial penis that could mechanically imitate natural coitus and by “direct observation”—the introduction of a speculum and bimanual palpation.

Results: The images obtained showed that during intercourse in the “missionary position” the penis has the shape of a boomerang and 1/3 of its length consists of the root of the penis.During female sexual arousal without intercourse the uterus was raised and the anterior vaginal wall lengthened.The size of the uterus did not increase during sexual arousal.Conclusion: Taking magnetic resonance images of the male and female genitals during coitus is feasible and contributes to understanding of anatomy.“I expose to men the origin of their first, and perhaps second, reason for existing.”1 Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) wrote these words above his drawing “The Copulation” in about 1493 (fig 1).2 The Renaissance sketch shows a transparent view of the anatomy of sexual intercourse as envisaged by the anatomists of his time.

The semen was supposed to come down from the brain through a channel which can be seen in the spine of the man.In the woman the right lactiferous duct is depicted as originating in the right female breast and ending in the genital area.Even a genius like Leonardo da Vinci distorted men's and women's bodies—as seen now—to fit the ideology of his time and to the notions of his colleagues, who he paid tribute to.Meanwhile, not to be outdone by their German colleagues, doctors at a Berlin hospital have made a medical breakthrough after capturing live MRI images of the miracle of birth.A team of obstetricians, radiologists and engineers at Charité Hospital have spent the last two years creating an “open” MRI scanner that allows a pregnant woman to fit fully into the machine to give birth.The pictures, taken after a 24-year-old mother agreed to give birth inside a magnetic-resonance imaging machine.